Campaigners hand in objections to Cory ‘Environmental’ and Roxhill’s damaging plans for red-listed birds on Bexley’s marshes

The campaigns in favour of protecting vital breeding habitat for Skylarks and Ringed Plovers in Bexley, red-listed birds in serious decline nationally, and the only breeding site for Little-ringed Plover in the Borough continued today (29th April). Campaigners from Friends of Crossness Nature Reserve and Bexley Natural Environment Forum handed in 192 letters of objection to Cory ‘Environmental’s’ plan to build on the Borax fields next to the nature reserve, and 124 to Roxhill’s scheme to destroy a large swathe of the southern part of Crayford Marshes, which is Green Belt, with a railfreight depot. Other objections have already been sent direct to the planning department.

Chris rose (Vice-chair, Bexley Natural environment Forum), Steve Carter and Donna Zimmer (Friends of Crossness Nature Reserve) at the Bexley Council offices with some of the 'Save our Skylarks' letters of objection, many with individual comments added by the signatories. (Photo: Ellen Webb)

Chris Rose (Vice-chair, Bexley Natural Environment Forum), Steve Carter and Donna Zimmer (Friends of Crossness Nature Reserve) at the Bexley Council offices holding some of the ‘Save our Skylarks’ letters of objection, many with individual comments added by the signatories. (Photo: Ellen Webb)

The Cory scheme would almost certainly see the two Plover species lost as breeding birds from Bexley, along with the loss of Skylarks from Erith Marshes. The only reasonably secure Skylark breeding site in the Borough would then be Crayford Marshes, where a significant part of their breeding area would be lost, and Corn Buntings – down to around 20 pairs in the whole of London – would also be hit, if Bexley approves Roxhill’s plans.

Steve with more 'post' for Bexley Council. The letters were packaged up and handed in at the reception desk on their way to the planning department. (Photo: Ellen Webb)

Steve with more ‘post’ for Bexley Council. The letters were packaged up and handed in at the reception desk on their way to the planning department. (Photo: Ellen Webb)

Chris Rose, Vice-chair of Bexley Natural Environment Forum said ‘Public money is being spent on trying to arrest and reverse the decline of Skylarks and Corn Buntings in the UK. It would be perverse and outrageous of the Council to approve these schemes which run counter to its own policy of protecting and enhancing biodiversity in the Borough. Councillors need to understand that these species have very specific habitat requirements and cannot just go somewhere else. Do they want to be part of driving that decline or do they want to ensure that their children and grandchildren, and down the generations beyond, can continue to enjoy the sight and sounds of these fantastic birds in Bexley?’

It's no joke! 'Save our Skylarks' protesters at Crossness on April 1st. Cory 'Environmental' has submitted the plan to build on two large fields in the name of its incinerator arm. (Photo: Richard Spink)

It’s no joke! ‘Save our Skylarks’ protesters at Crossness on April 1st. Cory ‘Environmental’ has submitted a plan to build on the two large fields in the background in the name of its unpopular incinerator arm. (Photo: Richard Spink)

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1 Response to Campaigners hand in objections to Cory ‘Environmental’ and Roxhill’s damaging plans for red-listed birds on Bexley’s marshes

  1. PETER BEDDOE says:

    As an expatriate of Bexley and environs, I am aghast at Roxhill’s (USA) intention to wreck Crayford marshes – childhood cycling territory – with a needless intermodal rail/road freight terminal. We’re about to fall victim to another huge one at M1 Jc24 – do not underestimate this firm’s intentions. Their next one south of here is about to be Daventry/Crick; next one north will be M1 Chesterfield and the concept of intermodal was tried in this country pre-war and failed. The British landmass is just too small for rail/road intermodal to work – in this family’s opinion.
    Daughter’s farm near Llandeilo is good red kite and buzzard country, and am excited they’ve been sighted in Bexley. Keep me posted please!

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